3 LSAT Logic Games Tips from LSAT Freedom

LSAT FreedomI’ll be honest — the LSAT makes my head hurt and I think about it as little as possible! That’s why we’re delighted to welcome Robert M. Fojo from LSAT Freedom to share and explain three LSAT Logic Games tips that will help you build a strong foundation for doing well on one of the more dreaded sections of the LSAT.

Better him than me! Enjoy. And good luck on the LSAT!

The LSAT Logic Games section is the shortest section of the LSAT. Yet it often provokes the strongest feelings among LSAT test-takers. People either love this section, or they hate it.

Both sides have a point. LSAT Logic Games either confuse or stimulate curiosity. The key to doing well on, and mastering, these Games is paying careful attention to detail. The following three tips demonstrate the need for developing this skill.

To sum it up in one sentence: pay very careful attention to the information these Games present, and extract as much additional data from that information as possible.

#1. Read and Digest Every Word

Unlike other sections on the LSAT, the LSAT Logic Games section does not waste a single word. On the Reading Comprehension section, you do not have to memorize all the information in the passage, or answer questions that address every piece of information presented.

In contrast, on the Logic Games section, every word and every item of information has meaning.

Miss anything, and you’ll answer several questions incorrectly.

This advice is critical because the test makers are actively trying to confuse you. For instance, consider the following made-up example that reflects a situation that arises often in this section:

  • Rule 1: Walt will finish earlier than Jesse.
  • Rule 2: Gus will finish earlier than Hank.
  • Rule 3: Skylar will not finish later than Marie.

The difference in wording between Rules 1 and 2 above (“finish earlier than”) and Rule 3 (“not finish later than”) is critically important.

If you read them as requiring the same thing, you will misinterpret the Rules and answer one or more questions incorrectly.

The phrase “finish earlier than” means Walt will finish before Jesse, and Gus will finish before Hank, while the phrase “not finish later than” means Skylar could finish before Marie, but could also finish tied with Marie. What is certain is that Skylar will not finish later than Marie.

When you review rules like the ones above, you need to spot information like this and make sure you understand the difference between these two requirements. You can bet one or more questions will address this distinction and force you to recognize and apply it.

#2. Recognize the Type of Game

The LSAT Logic Games section generally tests you on three types of games or skills:

  • Ordering
  • Grouping
  • Assigning

Some Games will reflect just one of these types or skills. Others will embody more than one.

When you first read a Game, you should try and determine what type of Game you are dealing with.

If you have practiced sufficiently and can recognize these types of Games quickly, you will (usually) know exactly what to expect with the rules/conditions and the questions that follow.

#3. Not What You Know, But What You Can Infer

Believe it or not, if you read and understand every word in an LSAT Logic Game, and you’re sharp as a nail at categorizing the type of Game you’re dealing with, that’s still not enough to do well on this section. Yes, you need to do more.

After doing all of the above, you need to infer, if possible, additional rules, conditions, or restrictions from the information that is provided.

Inferential reasoning is an important skill you must learn to do well on the LSAT in general. It appears not only on the Logic Games section, but also on the Reading Comprehension and Logical Reasoning sections. For Logic Games, developing and applying this skill will help you answer questions more quickly. For those shooting for a very high score, it will also, in part, mean the difference between missing a few questions, and getting every question right.

Consider the following example:

  • Rule 1: Walt will finish earlier than Jesse.
  • Rule 2: Jesse will finish earlier than Hank.

You should always look at all the information you have and determine whether you can create additional rules/conditions/restrictions to help guide you through the questions.

Here, given that (a) both rules above mention Jesse, (b) Walt will finish before Jesse, and (c) Jesse will finish before Hank, you can infer that, (d) Walt will finish before Hank. Thus, you have created a third rule:

  • Rule 3: Walt will finish earlier than Hank.

In many instances, a question will test your ability to make these inferences. If you can infer these additional rules at the outset, when you are diagramming the Game, you will be able to answer such questions very quickly because you already have the necessary information in front of you.

The three tips above will help you develop a strong foundation for doing well on LSAT Logic Games. The theme that runs through all of the tips above is the ability to pay careful attention to detail.

Succeeding as a lawyer will depend, in part, on — no surprise here — your ability to pay attention to detail and focus on the “little things.”

Doing well on the LSAT, and the Logic Games section, calls upon the same skill. Master that skill, and you’ll excel on both, the LSAT and in the practice of law.

— – —

Thanks, Robert! My head definitely hurts now, but the advice is solid.

Got LSAT questions? Leave your questions in the comments and we’ll get you answers.

Read On:

For more useful LSAT advice, check out Acing the LSAT: Prep Options.

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