A Review of the Better Habits App

Better Habits App ReviewPlease welcome back guest writer, Christen Morgan, attorney and Real Estate Specialist at a wireless infrastructure company, to discuss the new app, Better Habits.

Does it really take 21 days to form a habit? I sure thought so. Although I’ve never completely followed through with any of my New Year’s resolutions and tried and failed at numerous fad diets, I’ve always thought this concept to be true; think about a habit you want to form, commit to developing it over a course of 21 days, then voila, the habit will become a part of you for the rest of your life. I just always thought that I struggled to develop habits because I could barely commit to it for 10 days, much less meet the 21-day requirement. [Read more…]

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Can I Be an Introverted Attorney in a Profession that Seems Made for Extroverts?

Being an introvert in a profession that seems made for extrovertsToday we welcome back Christen Morgan, guest writer and foreclosure attorney, to discuss how to handle the legal profession as an introvert.

In a culture that’s permeated by visuals of “the outspoken attorney,” we’ve developed a concept that all attorneys should aspire to be the Johnnie Cochran, Robert Shapiro or Perry Mason type. It has been drilled into our minds that attorneys at the very least must be outgoing in an effort to fight the good fight and win the toughest legal battles within the courtroom. So if you’ve always been a quiet, reserved and overall introverted individual, it’s understood if you feel intimidated about pursuing this career. You may be passionate about the law, but you don’t see yourself arguing a major case before a judge and a jury. Also, while you can envision yourself communicating with clients on a one on one basis, you could never see yourself heading a client meeting with several attorneys and staff members involved. If you’ve experienced these thoughts at some point or another, I implore you to not give up on your attorney dreams just yet. Being introverted is by no means an indicator that you’re not a good lawyer. The stereotypes that we’ve been fed about this profession are simply just stereotypes and is in no way an indicator of a dominant attorney personality trait. The legal profession is filled with individuals from different backgrounds, personalities, and mindsets. I assure you that as an introvert, you are not alone. [Read more…]

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Applying to Law School? Need Some Expert Advice?

Interview with Ann LevinePlease welcome guest writer John Passmore, assistant managing legal editor in Houston, Texas, who interviews Ann Levine, expert on law school admissions.

Talking with Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert (3rd ed.)

The law school experience begins far before you sit down for your first class. First comes the law school admissions process. With a to-do list including the LSAT, your personal statement, letters of recommendation, scholarship applications, and much more, the process can quickly become daunting. If the process has you looking for some expert advice, you may be looking for lawyer, law school admissions consultant, and author Ann Levine. Formerly a law school admissions director, after founding Law School Expert, Ms. Levine helps students navigate the admissions process as an admissions consultant. She has recently published the third edition of her popular title The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert. We were able to ask Ms. Levine some questions about her work and why her book The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert could help you on your law school admissions journey.

[Read more…]

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Mid-Summer Check-In

Mid-Summer Check-in: Rising 2L perspective

Today we welcome back guest writer Shirlene Armstrong, rising 2L, to discuss the end of her summer experience and the anticipation of her 2L year.

My 2L year is rapidly approaching as we hit the mid summer point. Although it feels like I was taking exams and finishing my 1L year yesterday, it is almost time to go back to school and continue on my journey. Even though I feel like summer has been no time at all, I am thankful for all of the experiences from this summer and am looking forward to where my path will take me next. [Read more…]

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5 Things I’ve Learned as an “Older” Law Student From My Younger Colleagues

What I've Learned as an "Older" Law Student from my Younger Colleagues.

Today we welcome back Jaclyn Wishnia, rising 2L at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and aspiring entertainment law attorney, to discuss the generation gap at law schools and how to work together at any age.

Like most law students, I felt both nervous and excited on my first day of law school orientation. I also shared many of the same thoughts my colleagues have mentioned as well, such as would I make friends easily? Or would everyone be as cold and competitive as the rumor mill suggests? They were the typical questions of doubt anyone entering a new social situation, would ask themselves. Unlike many of my colleagues though, one major concern was dominating my nerves that day: my age.

It took me six years to finally apply to law school after college; the bulk of my twenties. I had lived through almost a decade of failures and triumphs, worked for prominent firms and attorneys, networked with top CEOs of reputable companies, and best of all, was now certain that I belonged in law school. Why was a petty number destroying my confidence? [Read more…]

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Working at a Smaller Firm

Working at a small law firmToday, we welcome back Shirlene Armstrong, guest writer and now rising second-year law student to share her experience working at a small law firm this summer.

In law school, your down time is dedicated to studying, living, and breathing the law. As such, law student’s summers are dedicated to the same. Thus, the summers between your 1L and 2L years and 2L and 3L years should be dedicated to some type of legal work. Normally, rising 2Ls land an internship with a judge, work in at a Prosecutor’s office, or have some other type of internship in the legal field. Some rising 3Ls land coveted “Summer Associate” positions and work as a young associate at a firm. Other 3Ls continue their positions at their old firms or jobs, take classes, work in a legal clinic, or do legal work in some other form. As a rising 2L, I was fortunate enough to land a paid position with a firm for the summer. [Read more…]

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Perspective on Being a First Generation College Student and Lawyer

Being a First Generation College Student and Lawyer: A First-Hand Perspective

Today, we welcome back Shirlene Armstrong, guest writer and now rising second-year law student to share her personal reflections on her experience as a first generation college and law student.

From a young age, my parents encouraged my sister and I to work hard and be successful at school. Ever since I can remember I knew that I would eventually go to college and get a degree, no matter what obstacles I had to overcome. With the love and support of my family, I became a first-generation college student. [Read more…]

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Gender Bias: What Female Law Students Should Know

gender bias

Please welcome Megan Canty, Director of Academic Success and Bar Exam Preparation at Wayne State University Law School and tutor at the Law School Toolbox, to talk about some of the challenges facing women in the legal profession, and ways to overcome them.

It’s no secret that women have made incredible strides in the legal profession over the past several decades. The first female lawyer in California was ridiculed by her opposing counsel, who told the jury that she could not “be expected to reason” and that “God Almighty decreed her limitations.” Luckily for you, you’re highly unlikely to face such blatant discrimination in your professional life. (If you do, you could get a large settlement or verdict from the offending party and retire to the Caribbean!)

The most recent statistics from the ABA’s Commission on Women in the Profession shows that women make up 51.3% of JD students, and that 36% of all lawyers are women. However, women have not advanced to positions of power in the legal profession at nearly the same rate as men. [Read more…]

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What Makes a Mentor?

mentorToday, we welcome back 2L contributor, Gabriella Martin, to talk about the value of having and being a mentor.

What is the point of mentor? Why is it a term that seems to be mentioned by every attorney you’ll meet, regardless of their field? Before coming to law school, I thought about this a lot. I have a pride streak a mile long and to me asking for a mentor or seeking help is a sign of weakness. Or so I thought.

Over the past year and half I have begun to collect mentors like some people collect stamps. Each mentor has their value, be it through the advice they offer, the ears they lend, or the support they give freely.

Although I’ve begun to be mentor myself (you’ll be amazed at the amount of advice you can pass on to someone who’s only a year below you), in order to know what makes mentoring so important, I sat down with two incredible women who I am honored to call my mentors. Maggie Castinado is a public defender in New Haven, CT and the immediate past president of the Connecticut Hispanic Bar Association. Paty Jimenez is junior associate at a large firm here in Connecticut, Reid & Riege.

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The Leaky Pipeline: Can Women Have a Family in BigLaw? (with Podcast)

Work-Life BlendingToday, we’re excited to announce the fourth episode of Law School Transparency’s podcast mini-series about women in the law. This week’s theme is the leaky pipeline for women in the legal profession and dealing with work-life blending issues.

For the next couple of weeks, we’ll be running posts related to the LST topic of the week, along with a podcast episode and roundtable discussion on the same topic. You can learn more at LSTradio.com/women. Hope you enjoy it!

[Read more…]

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