Law School Perspective – Tips to Help You Transition from Summertime to Studying

Law School Perspective - Tips to Help You Transition from Summertime to StudyingThis week we welcome back guest writer Shirlene Brown to discuss how to get back into school mode after a summer off.

Summer is the best time for law students. You can earn money through your summer jobs, catch-up with family and friends, and just relax! Unfortunately, summer went by so fast and the Fall semester is just around the corner. Now that the summer is winding down, it is time to get prepared for the school year to begin! I have been through three years of law school and thus I have lots of experience transitioning from summertime to school time. I have created a list of some tips that helped me get through the summertime sadness and get ready for the grind of a new school year. I hope these help you feel prepared for what another year of law school brings!  [Read more…]

Personal Mission, Vision, and Values Statements in Law School

Personal Mission, Vision, and Values Statements in Law SchoolThis week we welcome back guest writer Cathlyn Melvin to talk about finding a personal mission and figuring out your values as a law student and future lawyer.

Standing at a gas pump, your eyes glaze over at a posted paragraph about the fuel supplier’s mission to be “the world’s premier petroleum company.”

Okay.

Corporate mission statements, according to former Forbes contributor Len Sherman, “all say the right things about management’s deep concern for customers, employees, shareholders, communities and even planet Earth.”

Since they all sound kinda alike, and we’re all kinda jaded, business mission statements just don’t matter that much to consumers. [Read more…]

Motherhood as a Law Student

Motherhood as a Law StudentThis week we welcome guest writer Rigien Bagekany-Jackson, a recent law school graduate, to talk about how she has balanced motherhood and law school the last three years.

Do you ever reflect on how you got to where you are now? I do.

Sometimes you can pinpoint that moment or decision that brought you to where you are. For me, that moment was in June 2016. I was 35 weeks pregnant with my first child working at a bank when an armed man walked in and held me up at gunpoint. This was the point when I decided to start law school. I had initially thought to postpone my offer of acceptance, but at that moment, I knew that there had to be a way to make law school work with having a newborn child. [Read more…]

Doing a COVID-19 Media Diet

Doing a Covid-19 Media DietThis week we welcome guest writer and tutor Ariel Salzer to talk about disconnecting somewhat from media coverage of the coronavirus.

“The Coronavirus,” “COVID-19,” “the Rona” if you’re trying to make light of things, or, even scarier, just “the virus”… It’s all anyone is talking about. And it makes sense, right? We are worried—worried for our friends and family members who staff hospitals, worried for elderly relatives and kids with health problems. Worried about our own lives and futures. And you know what? This pervasive and all-consuming uneasiness is skyrocketing our stress levels. And worse, it’s affecting all of us. [Read more…]

LSAT Prep Options: Odyssey Test Prep

Odyssey Test Prep InfoWe’re excited to initiate a series of interviews with various LSAT prep companies, exploring their approach and getting some tips for success. (If you’d like to be featured, let me know.)

Today, we’re talking with Odyssey Test Prep about how their approach to studying for the LSAT.

Find out more below! [Read more…]

Tips for Applying to Law School with a Non-Traditional Background

Tips for Applying to Law School with a Non-Traditional BackgroundThis week we welcome back guest writer Briana Borgolini to talk about how to position yourself in your law school applications when you are not a “traditional” candidate.

Applying to law school can be intimidating for anyone, let alone someone who may have been out of a school setting for a few years, or more. Those who studied something seemingly unrelated to law, or spent a significant period of time working between undergrad and law school may be considered “non-traditional” compared to their counterparts applying directly from undergrad with more traditional pre-law majors. While non-traditional applicants may have to do some extra explaining to convince an admissions committee that they will be a successful law student, there are a number of things that can be done to make the application process a bit easier. [Read more…]

Applying to Law School? Need Some Expert Advice?

Interview with Ann LevinePlease welcome guest writer John Passmore, assistant managing legal editor in Houston, Texas, who interviews Ann Levine, expert on law school admissions.

Talking with Ann Levine, author of The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert (3rd ed.)

The law school experience begins far before you sit down for your first class. First comes the law school admissions process. With a to-do list including the LSAT, your personal statement, letters of recommendation, scholarship applications, and much more, the process can quickly become daunting. If the process has you looking for some expert advice, you may be looking for lawyer, law school admissions consultant, and author Ann Levine. Formerly a law school admissions director, after founding Law School Expert, Ms. Levine helps students navigate the admissions process as an admissions consultant. She has recently published the third edition of her popular title The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert. We were able to ask Ms. Levine some questions about her work and why her book The Law School Admission Game: Play Like an Expert could help you on your law school admissions journey.

[Read more…]

Should I Take a Gap Year Before Law School?

Should I take a Gap Year Before Law School?

Today we welcome Christen Morgan, guest writer and foreclosure attorney, to discuss taking a year off before starting law school.

Should You Take a Gap Year Before Law School?

Well, it depends. Taking a gap year before beginning your law school career can certainly be a beneficial alternative as opposed to jumping right in after four years of college. Although I highly recommend this alternative venture, taking a gap year will only be worthwhile based on your current situation. If you’re a non-traditional college student, who perhaps started college later in life after already receiving some work experience, or a student who worked full time during college and completed their bachelor’s degree on a part-time basis, then taking a gap year before law school may not be in your best interests. A gap year is a perfect opportunity to gain full-time work experience, to travel or to complete a fellowship. These are all experiences that should be completed with the intent of enhancing your resume for post-graduate legal employment. If you’re a non-traditional student, chances are you may have already amassed a wealth of the above experiences to enhance your resume. Therefore, jumping right into law school after college without taking a gap year should not hurt your chances in the legal job hunt.

[Read more…]

LSAT Prep Options: Magoosh

Magoosh

We’re excited to initiate a series of interviews with various LSAT prep companies, exploring their approach and getting some tips for success. (If you’d like to be featured, let me know.)

Today, we’re talking with Magoosh, a self-study option that prides themselves on being affordable and tailored to the individual students needs. Welcome! [Read more…]

3 Things You Need To Know About LSAT Arguments

LSAT FreedomWorried about the LSAT? We’re delighted to welcome back Robert M. Fojo from LSAT Freedom to share and explain three things you should know about LSAT arguments that will help you build a strong foundation for doing well on the LSAT. Good luck!

Here’s Robert . . .

The LSAT is built on arguments. On the Logical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension sections, students will see a lot of arguments. For example, the stimulus of many Logical Reasoning questions will contain an argument. Students will have to evaluate that argument. They may have to find a flaw in the argument, describe the structure of the argument, or identify a missing assumption.

Similarly, on the Reading Comprehension section, most of the passages will consist of individuals making some kind of argument or, at the very least presenting a thesis and some evidence to support it in an effort to convince the reader of something.

Because arguments comprise the foundation for the LSAT, students must understand (1) what arguments are; (2) how they function; and (3) how arguments appear on the LSAT.
[Read more…]