A Review of the Better Habits App

Better Habits App ReviewPlease welcome back guest writer, Christen Morgan, attorney and Real Estate Specialist at a wireless infrastructure company, to discuss the new app, Better Habits.

Does it really take 21 days to form a habit? I sure thought so. Although I’ve never completely followed through with any of my New Year’s resolutions and tried and failed at numerous fad diets, I’ve always thought this concept to be true; think about a habit you want to form, commit to developing it over a course of 21 days, then voila, the habit will become a part of you for the rest of your life. I just always thought that I struggled to develop habits because I could barely commit to it for 10 days, much less meet the 21-day requirement. [Read more…]

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A 2L’s Guide to 1L Year: How to Go From Surviving to Succeeding

SucceedPlease welcome back Gabriella Martin, our now 3L guest writer from Quinnipiac University School of Law. Now that you’ve got your bearings, she offers some great insight on what to expect and how to thrive!

So you’ve gotten through the first couple weeks of 1L year—you know where your classes are, you know what the professors are looking for, and you’re probably starting to breathe a little easier. But of course, because you’re a fast paced person like the rest of us, you’re probably thinking . . . now what?

Well now, baby shark, now that you’ve discovered your legal super powers, it’s time to start learning how to navigate the waters and begin your journey to becoming a legal superhero. To get you started, here are a handful of tips I wish I would have known just over a year ago. [Read more…]

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Law School Lessons from TV

Law School Lessons from TV

Today we welcome back Shirlene Armstrong, 2L guest writer, to discuss law school lessons that can be learned from TV.

Unless you are or have been a law student, it is difficult to demonstrate the life of law students and the legal world. Honestly, it’s difficult to even explain it to a “layperson.” However, Hollywood has attempted to tackle this issue and show the “typical law school experience” in the form of media. Television is great and it allows viewers to get a taste of what something is like. There is a difference though between “reality” and “reality tv.” Hollywood tends to dramatize everyday life and law school is no exception. Although these entertainment pieces may give you a perception of what law school is like, your expectations of law school will be very different from reality if you rely solely on Hollywood’s version. [Read more…]

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The Case For Dating in Law School: 5 Arguments of Advocacy

The Case For Dating in Law School - 5 Arguments of AdvocacyToday we welcome back Jaclyn Wishnia, rising 2L at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law to discuss why dating in law school might be a good idea.

There are plenty of articles circulating the Internet that advise against dating in law school. I can personally attest to the fact that the authors of these articles were all spurned by their lovers during particularly harrowing Barristers’ Ball events (Kidding! As far as I know…). While realistically I cannot confirm whether this statement holds some partial truths or not, I can endorse the authors who contradict this advice by providing you with some insight into why it might actually be a very reasonable decision. [Read more…]

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Could Stereotype Threat be Impacting Your Academic Performance?

Stereotype Threat - What it is and How to Minimize it

Please welcome back Jennifer Warren, attorney and Academic Achievement Coordinator at Oklahoma City University School of Law, to talk about how stereotype threat could be impacting your academic performance in law school.

Despite the strides towards equality and fair treatment that have been made over the last decades, negative academic stereotypes about women still exist. While on the surface you may dismiss these stereotypes as utter nonsense deriving from outdated beliefs, they could still be subconsciously affecting your academic performance through a psychological occurrence known as stereotype threat.

[Read more…]

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Law School Myth #6: You Can Trust a Law School’s Employment Numbers

GamblingLaw schools release a decent amount of information about their graduates’ prospects, so it’s easy to think you’re getting the full story.

You’re probably not.

Schools fudge data in a variety of ways, but the most common approach is simply not to report unflattering information on graduates’ salaries.

[Read more…]

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Law School Myth #5: Getting a Law Degree Opens Lots of Doors

Closed door“A law degree is really flexible! It opens lots of doors.” Do not believe this statement. Hearing it makes me want to scream.

While it’s true that huge numbers of lawyers simply quit the profession entirely, it DOES NOT FOLLOW that the reason they’re no longer lawyers is because their law degree opened lots of other doors.

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Law School Myth #4: Life as a Lawyer is Exciting and Intellectually Challenging

StressIf you believe pop culture, life as a lawyer is pretty exciting.

Jury trials take half an hour and there’s an ongoing highlight reel of witty cross-examination and bombshell surprise evidence. Sadly, that’s not the way things work in reality.

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Law School Myth #2: Student Loan Debt is Good Debt

Cut up the credit cardsPeople often say you shouldn’t worry about student loan debt — that it’s “good debt.” In some cases, this might be true.

Taking out student loans is an investment in your human capital.

To the extent they enable you to do something you couldn’t otherwise do, i.e., afford to pay for law school so you can become an attorney, student loans might be justifiable.

However, it depends on the specifics:
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Law School Myth #3: Law School Gives You Three More Years to Decide What to Do With Your Life

MazeAre you applying to law school because you want three more years to figure out what to do with your life? Guess what. That’s not the way this works.

You need to know where you want to work geographically, and what kind of work you want to do, well before graduation.

In fact, it’s helpful to know both of these things before the end of your first semester.

[Read more…]

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